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A Different Kind of Tour: Derry

On the 23rd of October 2014, 8 members of Veterans For Peace UK started a 4 day journey across the North of Ireland, in order to meet people and organisations drawn from communities which they had previously been deployed against as soldiers. In the first of three films they meet Bloody Sunday families who are still fighting for justice after over 40 years.

  • Angela. Kenny 24/12/2014, 16:54

    Powerful and moving. I have certainly learnt from this. Thank you.

  • Bart Bolger 24/12/2014, 16:59

    Thank you all so much for this wonderful documentary! It’s incredibly moving and enlightening to hear both from the victims’ families and from some of those who were in the forces at the time.
    I’m also struck by the similarities to other occupation forces’ transgressions on human rights today, such as Israel vs. Palestine and in our own communities of color here in the US.
    We eagerly await the future videos and will share them widely here.
    Thank you again for your bravery in sharing your stories and to all those involved in the project for helping to reconcile the two sides; for the government apparatus surely isn’t interested, it appears.

  • Garry 24/12/2014, 18:12

    Thanks for this very insightful, frank and moving documentary. I have never been to NI but I always had an interest and concern for the pointless and seemingly deliberate hatred passed on from generation to generation, from parents to children where everybody talked, looked and lived the same. I felt that terror, on both sides including those who called themselves `loyalists` were undistinguishable and that being part of such groups transcended ideology and passion but had more to do with power, identity and control. I felt for every victim, military, civilian, catholic, protestant, nationalist and loyalist alike, I regretfully accept, too, that I had a hatred for the IRA. PIRA, during my early years of service on the RAF. RAF members as well as soldiers, were targeted by PIRA both in the in the UK and during my time in Germany (I remember checking my car everyday for IEDs outside my AMQ) but, with time, I drew my own conclusions about the situation in NI. The Catholic population were indeed discriminated against, had poor housing, poor job prospects, lack of political representation (as highlighted in this film) and maybe, just maybe, Op` Banner could have taken a more humanitarian and unbiased approach in 1969 instead of the terrible course it took instead.

    To all the victims of violence I offer my sincere regret and sorrow during those years of hatred. I hope that all those who wish to perpetuate such acts on another lame excuse will be banished!

    Garry Harriman

  • Alphonse Gabriel 25/12/2014, 08:26

    I did tour,s in 88 op banner,clougher county fermanghe ,wish i had not .I couldn,t watch the video i recocgnise how hurt i still am.

  • Alphonse Gabriel 26/12/2014, 08:37

    Hello, well i watched it many memories came flashing back i,m still lost for words except sorry for all the people in Irland.